What are foods that instigate the histamine response?

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It is important to note that histamine naturally occurs in the body and released during an allergic response and when the individual is under stress. Histamine is also present in certain foods and eventually broken down by an enzyme.

In some individuals, they generate limited amounts of this enzyme called as diamine oxidase which leads to histamine intolerance and results to headache, diarrhea, rashes, asthma, hives, low blood pressure, erratic heartbeat and itchy skin. At the present, there is no cure for histamine intolerance, but avoidance of foods that contain histamine can help alleviate or prevent the symptoms. You can learn how to readily manage an allergic reaction by enrolling in one of the first aid courses today. The individual should consult a doctor regarding foods that contain histamine so that these foods can be avoided.

Meat and cheeses

Fermented, aged and processed meats and cheeses are packed with histamine. This is not an issue for some but it can trigger an allergic response in highly sensitive individuals. It includes sausage, salami, hotdogs, ham, dried meats and deli meats. When it comes to cheeses, those that should be avoided include parmesan, blue cheese, cheddar, camembert, Swiss, Gouda, brie and gruyere.

Histamine

In some individuals, they generate limited amounts of this enzyme called as diamine oxidase which leads to histamine intolerance and results to headache, diarrhea, rashes, asthma, hives, low blood pressure, erratic heartbeat and itchy skin.

Fish

Among the foods that are high in histamine, fish is included in the list. Fishes that are high in histamine include herring, sardines, mackerel and tuna. Some types of fish are also linked with scombrotoxin which is a histamine toxicity triggered by incorrectly chilled fish. It is important to note that scombrotoxin can instigate burning sensation around the mouth, diarrhea and facial flushing. The fishes that are commonly linked with scombrotoxin include tuna, bonito, mackerel, marlin and sardines.

Alcohol

Always remember that all types of alcohol contain histamine but the top in the list include champagne, beer and wine. A highly sensitive individual should avoid drinking any alcoholic beverages.

Vegetables

Pickles, sauerkraut, olive and other vegetables that are preserved or pickled are packed with histamine. Even fresh vegetables are essentially high in histamine and it includes pumpkin, tomato, avocado, eggplant, spinach and mushroom. Take note that tomato products such as chili sauce, ketchup and canned tomatoes are also high in histamine.

Other foods to avoid

Other foods that can trigger a histamine response include foods that have artificial coloring and preservatives, commercial candies, chocolate, flavored milk, fermented soy products, tea, carbonated beverages, chicken, fermented milk products, yeast products, sour breads, homemade root beer and smoked fish.

Dried fruits are also packed with histamine but can be tolerated by some individuals as long as properly washed. There are also certain foods that do not contain histamine but can trigger a histamine response which leads to negative side effects. These possible histamine-releasing foods include chocolate, alcohol, fish, bananas, milk, pineapple, papaya, shellfish, strawberries, raw egg whites and tomatoes.

 

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At St Mark James Training we work hard to ensure accurate and useful information on our blog website. However, the information that we post on our website is purely for educational purposes and should not be used as diagnosis or treatment. If you need medical advise please contact a medical professional

  • All stmarkjamestraining.ca content is reviewed by a medical professional and / sourced to ensure as much factual accuracy as possible.

  • We have strict sourcing guidelines and only link to reputable websites, academic research institutions and medical articles.

  • If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate, out-of-date, or otherwise questionable, please contact us through our contact us page.